auto service Sewell

The automotive service team at Miles Auto Service is passionate about keeping vehicles properly maintained so they can perform at peak condition for as long as possible. Some of our clients’ vehicles have 200k+ miles, are still in admirable condition, and have many more serviceable years left in them. And, by the way, they welcome the fact that these dependable rides were completely paid off years ago.

Conversely, we also occasionally see newish vehicles that have been utterly thrashed and abused. We often remind our clients (for good reason) that missing maintenance services like oil changes has some pretty serious consequences, but we don’t stress the importance of interior care nearly enough. In today’s post, we turn our attention to caring for leather auto upholstery. Leather is quite strong and will serve you well if properly cared for. If you have never given a thought to your leather auto seats, we urge you to spend twenty minutes on your next day off and give them a good cleaning and conditioning.

Do: Consult your owner’s manual to see if there are any special guidelines for your leather upholstery.

Do: Clean and condition your leather interior upholstery at least four times a year. Once a month is even better. Start a regular cleaning schedule as soon as you buy your auto, whether new or used. It will only take a few minutes each time and they will remain looking new.

Do: Use cleaners and conditioners designed specifically for leather upholstery, or make your own with olive oil and vinegar, or Castile soap and warm water.

Do: Follow the product directions.

Don’t: Use products with ammonia, bleach, or silicone.

Do: Test the cleaner on an inconspicous area to be certain that there are no unintended effects.

Do: Vacuum the seats first to expel particles of dirt. If the grit is left on the seats, it may scratch the leather when you wipe them down.

Do: Use a vinyl or horse hair brush. Wipe dry with a micro-fiber cloth. There are also special brushes that can be used with a cordless drill or rotary buffer.

Do: Repeat the cleaning process several times if there is a lot of dirt build-up.

Don’t: Saturate the seats with the cleaning products. This could cause stains, or the liquid could soak through to the cushion. Be especially careful if the leather is perforated.

Do: Clean up spills quickly to reduce the chance of staining.

If would like to hire a professional detailer, call Miles Auto Service at (856) 441-3894 for a recommendation. If you need quality engine repair or maintenance, stop by our service center at 1007 Tuckahoe Rd. in Sewell or call to make an appointment.

      You have likely driven in a variety of circumstances in your years of driving. You probably have driven in downpours, high winds, and even blizzard like conditions. You may have driven on roads that were slippery, gotten misdirected by detours, and ran out of gas a time or two. The benefit of all of these is that hopefully you have learned from them. We know better, what it takes to get through or even avoid these situations. Our teen drivers, however, have no such experience. It may take years for them to experience unexpected issues on the road. But you can put your own expertise to good use by making sure teens have specific items in their cars.

Let's take for example a situation where due to a flat tire or other mechanical issue, your teen needs to pull off of a busy highway or freeway onto the berm. This can be pretty scary, especially when cars are buzzing by at 65 miles per hour, just feet away. This is where some sort signal device can be very handy. By giving fellow travelers enough time with reflective signs, cones, flares or LED lights to notice the disabled vehicle they can better give enough leeway for safe passage. This is particularly true at night when visibility is limited. Even if they have a cell phone and road service those 30 minutes or more waiting for assistance can be worrisome. Make sure their car has some sort of signal device and make sure they understand how to safely use it to warn traffic.

One of the very basic things every teen should have in their car is a flashlight. It can be used to signal for help, it can be used to help them inspect a problem at night, or even to make themselves more visible should it be necessary to leave the vehicle. Keep in mind, you should advise your teen that it is usually considered best practice to stay with a disabled vehicle however.

A first aid kit can come in handy in your teen's vehicle. It doesn't have to be anything dramatic or extensive, but many times we are on the road and could use a bandage, gauze, scissors, cloth tape, aspirin and tweezers. Including some insect repellent and sunscreen can also be a good idea. If you want to be be extra safe, include a couple of bottles of water or even an energy bar or two.

Of course, along with these items you'll want to make sure you have your car insurance card, emergency telephone numbers and always have a charged cell phone. We have any easy way to prepare your teen for the road with our complete list of items they should have in their car to be safer. We encourage you to view the list and perhaps, if you choose, order our complete kit. When your teen is on the road it can be stressful. Reduce that stress by making sure they are prepared.

You have likely driven in a variety of circumstances in your years of driving. You probably have driven in downpours, high winds, and even blizzard like conditions. You may have driven on roads that were slippery, gotten misdirected by detours, and ran out of gas a time or two. The benefit of all of these is that hopefully you have learned from them. We know better, what it takes to get through or even avoid these situations. Our teen drivers, however, have no such experience. It may